Best Creatine: Ranking

The best creatine monohydrate

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  1. Creatine Powder ( Optimum Nutrition)
  2. Creatine Monohydrate ( Dymatize)
  3. Cell-Tech Hardcore ( MuscleTech)
  4. COR Performance Creatine ( Cellucor)
  5. SizeOn ( Gaspari Nutrition)
How to take creatine for weight gain and increase in strengthmuscles - daily dosages.

Action of creatine

The main function of creatine is to provide the body with energy during active physical activity. At the same time, during the power load, the energy of creatine stored directly in the muscle tissues is first used, and only then is the energy of glucose.

The presence of creatine in the muscles allows you to train more actively using higher working weights. In addition, since the binding molecule of water is required to store the creatine molecule, creatine stores visually increase the amount of muscle.

Daily requirement of

Creatine is a nitrogen-containing carboxylic acid contained in the muscle tissues of animals. Its name is derived from the Greek word "kreas", translated as "meat" - in one kilogram of raw meat contains about 3-6 gr.creatine( 1).

For athletes training for the purpose of muscle growth, the daily intake of creatine is about 2 grams. At the same time, considering the percentage of losses during preparation and digestion of food, it is necessary to talk about the consumption of 1-1.5 kg of meat per day.

Creatine monohydrate in additives

On the one hand, creatine is an absolutely natural element of nutrition( this is indicated by its name), on the other hand, the use of a large amount of meat to replenish creatine reserves in muscles can negatively affect digestion.

The optimal solution is the intake of creatine in the form of additives. Given that creatine was first isolated from meat in 1832( 1), industrial production of inexpensive and high quality creatine monohydrate is not particularly difficult.

Do I need to drink creatine?

With a high degree of probability, a regular trainee does not receive the required amount of creatine with food, which affects the reduction of strength and fatigue in the process of active physical training.

With the normalization of creatine intake, both an increase in the strength of the athlete and an increase in the volume of his muscles are often observed, due to more active training and the accumulation of water necessary for the storage of creatine.

Rating of the most effective sports nutrition for weight gain and rapid muscle mass gain.

How to take creatine?

Given the increased need for an organism in creatine with active physical activity, most modern sports experts recommend the constant intake of small doses of creatine monohydrate - about 2-5 grams per day( 3).

It is important to mention that the intake of creatine by cycles( alternating loads of 15-20 grams per day with rest periods) does not bear any significant advantages. In addition, sugar or other simple carbohydrates also have almost no effect on the assimilation of creatine.

Harm and side effects of creatine

Creatine monohydrate is one of the most researched sports supplements. Numerous scientific studies and testing in humans have not revealed a risk of any side effects of creatine intake in a healthy person( 3).However, it is important to note that those who suffer from such chronic diseases as asthma or various kinds of allergies, it is recommended to consult with your doctor for additional safety before taking the creatine.

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Creatine is one of the most popular and important sports supplements for increasing strength and accelerating muscle mass gain. This supplement is highly recommended for use by trainers of any levels of training.

Scientific sources:

  1. Creatine, Wikipedia Article, source
  2. Brosnan JT, da Silva RP, Brosnan ME.The metabolic burden of creatine synthesis. Amino Acids., Source
  3. Creatine, An Article at Examine.com, source